Volume 3. DICTIONARY OF CONTEMPORARY, ANCIENT AND BABYLONIAN ASSYRIAN Maximillien de Lafayette

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Published: July 3rd 2013

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252 pages


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Volume 3. DICTIONARY OF CONTEMPORARY, ANCIENT AND BABYLONIAN ASSYRIAN  by  Maximillien de Lafayette

Volume 3. DICTIONARY OF CONTEMPORARY, ANCIENT AND BABYLONIAN ASSYRIAN by Maximillien de Lafayette
July 3rd 2013 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 252 pages | ISBN: | 10.20 Mb

Paperback available at lulu.com & worldwide. Authors website: maximilliendelafayettebibliography.or...Volume 3 From a set Of 4 Volumes Approx. 1,300 PagesSamples of words definitions:Dadmi: Babylonian-Assyrian. NounThe human race, mankindMorePaperback available at lulu.com & worldwide. Authors website: maximilliendelafayettebibliography.or...Volume 3 From a set Of 4 Volumes Approx. 1,300 PagesSamples of words definitions:Dadmi: Babylonian-Assyrian.

NounThe human race, mankindNebuchadnezzar said: Sa ideena harooti iz sapa isaarti ana paqada jal dadmi. Translated verbatim: Who gives the scepter of justice to rule over mankind.Adami in Arabic means manDak: Ancient Assyrian. Noun. A soldier. (Plural: Daki).Although Dak is used in the singular form, on any Assyrian tablets, Dak appeared in the plural form.Later on in history, Dak was replaced by Dikta, Daku, and Diktu, meaning soldiers- warriors, fighting menDak-suunu aprooz.-SennacheribTranslated verbatim I cut their warriors into pieces.Tiglath Pileser said:Dikta suunu adook.Danan: Babylonian-Assyrian.

Noun. PowerAssur said Danan Ashur Ihstar va ilil rabi biliiya imsi ma itagiil ana ramani su. Translated verbatim: He placed away the power of Ashur, Ishtar, and the great gods, my Lords and trusted to his own workDandanni: Babylonian-Assyrian/Babylonian/Sumerian/Akkadian. Adjective. Very powerful, mighty. El dandannu is an Assyrian expression, which means God all mighty. In some Assyrian and Sumerian passages, Dandannu also meant the most high.

Aninib gisri dandani.-Sardanapalus. Translated verbatim: To Ninib, most highly heroChamashu: Akkadian/Babylonian-Assyrian. Noun. The sun. Note: Zit shamsi means the rising sun, in Ancient AssyrianChameta, in contemporary Assyrian Western dialectChamo, in contemporary Assyrian Western dialectChimsha, in contemporary Assyrian Eastern dialectChimsho, in contemporary Assyrian Western dialectChams (Shams), and Chamsu Shamsu, in ArabicChemesh Shemesh in Hebrew and AramaicChamash in SumerianCham Cham, and Chem Shem in PhoenicianChem Shem in UgariticUltu zit shamsi adi erib shamsi- Esar HaddonTranslation: From the rising of the sun to the setting of the sun.Cherub, Kruv, Kirubu, Chirubu:Aramaic/Sumerian/Akkadian/Assyrian.

NounA word borrowed from the ancient Assyrian Kirubu and Karâbu, which mean to be nearCherub is an ancient name for the angels (Cherubim)Cherubim is the Hebrew masculine pluralIn Assyrian literature, Kirubu was a Guardian Angel in charge of protecting and guarding the main gate of Assyrian palaces, usually depicted as a huge winged bull with the face of a manChaykhana: Aramaic. Noun. A tea houseComposed of two words:a-Chay, which means teab-Khana, which means house, and sometimes a store or a shopThe archaic Turkish word Khan (Khana) and Arabic word Khan mean store, shop or souk (A market)Chay means the same thing in several Semitic, Anatolian, Middle and Near Eastern countriesKhana (Kha pronounced like Jose in Spanish) derived from the word Khan, which could mean many things such as a place, a store, a center, a big house, a large locationThe origin of the word Khan or Khana is unknown.

It appeared in numerous languages, including Mongolian, Turkish, Urdu, Persian, etc.



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